Cybersecurity Fundamentals – Change the Economics

Cybersecurity Fundamentals – Change the Economics

Cybersecurity Fundamentals – Change the Economics

Cyber-attacks are asymmetrical and reap large monetary and national security rewards, far greater than the resources they require.

Consider this statement from the 2014 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report: “2013 may be remembered as the ‘year of the retailer breach,’ but a comprehensive assessment suggests it was a year of transition from geopolitical attacks to large-scale attacks on payment card systems.”

Stealing cars, robbing banks, or stealing an individual’s identity, offer less financial return than a database or stream of millions of credit card numbers. The frequency and volume of attacks indicates that current cybersecurity methods to protect sensitive information may not be sufficient, and perhaps the rate of attack will not slow until the risk or cost to the attackers becomes too high compared to the value of a breach.

Raising the cost or reducing the value of an attack is not easy, particularly when many attacks originate from countries without extradition agreements. Limited law enforcement capabilities make many of methods to combat this controversial. The notion of a counterattack requires more precision than we usually have in identifying the attacker within the necessary timeframe. A counterattack risks a great deal of collateral damage and potential diplomatic fallout. This is a long-term problem that requires long-term, indirect actions for any economic change. In that context, here are some ideas that might have an impact:

  • Participating in economic activity with the U.S. is a boon to most countries. As a result, cybercrime also impacts their economies. Before agreeing to trade agreements and economic treaties, the U.S. might require other countries to commit to cooperative law enforcement investigations and legislated programs for reducing cybercrime activities within their borders
  • Assign each credit card issued a set of decoy numbers that are recorded at the same time the real number is used to make a purchase. Over time, databases and point of sale applications will become loaded with several multiples of decoy numbers, lessening the chance that a real number is used in a fraudulent transaction involving stolen numbers. This makes it easier for the retailer to identify fraudulent transactions, and reduces the value of the compromised data

The complexity of geopolitics, technology, economic interests, and law enforcement operations for combating cyber-attacks will continue to make reaching, litigating, and incarcerating cyber-criminals very challenging. Efforts to increase the risk or cost to attackers will take a long time to implement and have an effect, but this is clearly a long time problem. 

Contributors

* Arc Aspicio |

Arc Aspicio is a management, strategy, and technology consulting firm that takes a mission-oriented approach to complex client challenges. As a rapidly growing company, Arc Aspicio has a bold strategy for 2016-2018 that drives growth through new capabilities in strategy, design, human capital, data analytics, information sharing, cybersecurity, and strategic communications. The company is known for a strong, collaborative culture that values gratitude – for its clients and its great team. And, #welovedogs! Follow us on Twitter @arcaspicio or learn more at www.arcaspicio.com.

Lynn Ann Casey / Chief Executive Officer
info@arcaspicio.com
703.465.2060

Confessions of a Chief Strategy Officer

Confessions of a Chief Strategy Officer

I’ll admit it, I was a little smug. After more than 20 years in the consulting business helping clients develop, implement, and integrate their strategies, I thought… “how hard could it be to do the same things for my own company – a company of consultants?” I had the commitment of my leadership, a group of talented people, and a plan and resources to grow the company. We had energy and we had a great process and tools to successful. What could go wrong?

Exploring Trends in Strategic Workforce Planning (Attract, Engage, and Retain)

Exploring Trends in Strategic Workforce Planning (Attract, Engage, and Retain)

Federal agencies have been undergoing significant transformation, requiring effective workforce strategies that can assist them in facing increasing challenges. As government leaders look for and implement initiatives to improve performance, Strategic Workforce Planning, (SWP) has become instrumental in assisting organizations to focus on their most important resource: their people

#Innovate Your Heart Out: We See an Innovation Day in Your Future

#Innovate Your Heart Out: We See an Innovation Day in Your Future

Innovation is difficult to harness for organizations of all sizes (Government and private sector alike). Replicating a process to encourage and produce innovation is even more challenging. Innovating in a structured space and time seems counter-intuitive, and begs the question: can thinking outside the box be a structured activity? Arc Aspicio recently held an Innovation Day to answer this question.

A Unified Brand Helps Serve a Complex Mission

A Unified Brand Helps Serve a Complex Mission

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), created in 2003, undertook the most significant reorganization of federal agencies since the Cold War. It brought together federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial agencies with a focus on securing the U.S. from threats in a collaborative way. DHS pulls together five complex mission areas: preventing terrorism and enhancing security; managing our borders; administering immigration laws; securing cyberspace; and ensuring disaster resilience.

Towards Preparedness and an Emergency Management Workforce of the Future

Towards Preparedness and an Emergency Management Workforce of the Future

Grit and determination. This is what the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) workforce is known for. After what is arguably the most challenging year in its history, the FEMA leadership called on the agency to enable the workforce through four elements: build, empower, sustain, and train. A key factor in creating a scalable, sustainable disaster response workforce is to foster a proactive culture, one focused on preparedness. A proactive mindset can create an environment that asks the “what if” questions that lead to more prepared response efforts.