How to Survive a Snowpacalypse

How to Survive a Snowpacalypse

Did snowquestration leave you buried in snow or, as was the case in DC, several inches of water? If so, then this is the blog for you.

In the last few years, the U.S. has been slammed by a series of natural disasters. To raise awareness on how to prepare before the next disaster strikes, the Federal Government celebrated March 3-9 as National Severe Weather Preparedness Week. Their goal? To share practical tips on what to do before the next round of severe weather – like snow storms, hurricanes or tornadoes – hits your area.

In many cases, severe weather is hard to predict. It is extremely important that you and your family take the necessary precautions to stay safe. In an earlier blog, we discussed interesting ways you can promote emergency preparedness among the young and teens. We now discuss some critical steps YOU can take to prepare yourself and family for severe weather.

  • Know Your Risk: Understand the type of hazardous weather that could affect where you live, work, and/or study. Check the weather forecast regularly and sign up to receive alerts from your local emergency management officials (e.g., Washington DC)
  • Take Action: Make sure you and your loved ones know what to do before, during and after severe weather. Start by putting together an emergency kit and preparing a family communications plan. Carry out emergency drills with your family so everyone is ready when a real emergency strikes
  • Be an Example: Once you are ready, be a leader in your community and encourage those around you to prepare as well. Studies show that people are more likely to act and prepare when they see others taking action
  • Use Social Media: Share your preparedness tips with others on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn

FEMA’s Ready.gov site is a great resource for tips and suggestions on how to prepare for severe weather. Additionally, in early January, FEMA launched its new mobile site to increase information accessibility. The new site is easier to navigate and offers information and resources on emergency preparedness and what to do before, during and after a disaster.

Do not wait... Start preparing for the next hurricane, earthquake, or snowquestration TODAY.

Contributors

Cristina Cajigas |

Cristina is a strategy and communications manager with experience in strategic and organizational planning, communications development, data analyzing and processing, and document management. Cristina is passionate about homeland security and intelligence. She has specialized interest in international law, security policy, border protection, and emergency management. Cristina is bilingual in Spanish and English.

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